Posts Tagged ‘india’

The Cowherds

June 10th, 2011

Hyderabad is a fantastic and interesting place.

We were lucky enough to have a great driver who doubled as a tour guide on my trip there. As we were driving on a highway, I spotted the ruin of a mosque rising up from the small buildings to the right of us.

I asked the driver to stop, and we entered the narrow streets and headed towards it. And there it was, around the bend. Absolutely beautiful. Overgrown with green. Small plants and flowers growing out of cracks. Hundreds of years old, by the looks of it. Neglected. Crumbling. Seeming forgotten despite the bustle of life around it.

The mosque turned out to be inaccessible. Walled off from all sides. The driver, a man in his sixties, told us that he used to come often to that neighbourhood as a child. But as sectarian troubles began to increase between Hindus and Muslims, gradually the Muslims left the neighbourhood.

Round the back of the mosque, we came across a herd of cows and goats, tied up and docile.

Turned out the Hindu family nearby were raising them. Also turned out that the family elder was our driver’s wrestling instructor when he was a child. They hadn’t seen each other in some fifty years. It was an extraordinary moment.

We got to spend a little time with the family, and eventually I was allowed to take pictures.

The elder:

The son:

Father & son:

I feel privileged to have gotten a glimpse at a different side of life in India. One not many people get to see.

More coming soon!

Share

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Animals, People, Portraits, Travel/Urban | Comments (1)

The Coconut Vendor

April 9th, 2011

This portrait was made in Hyderabad, India, as I took a stroll in the early evening. Makeshift stalls were everywhere on the crowded streets, with vendors selling their wares as people celebrated the Makar Sankranti harvest festival.

To me this picture represents the innate kindness and generosity of people. The small kindness of strangers, and how the smallest of things – a smile – can allow people to open up to others. This lady initially tried to sell me some coconuts, and after a smile and a laugh were exchanged, she handed me a flower as a token of the festival season.

More coming soon!

Share

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in People, Portraits, Travel/Urban | Comments (0)

Makar Sankranti – Bhogi!

March 27th, 2011

We arrived in Hyderabad at a rather ungodly hour of the morning. It wasn’t yet dawn when we arrived at our guest house but the inhabitants of neighbouring houses were outside, making small fires at the entrances to their dwellings, talking, and drawing in chalk upon the ground. Children were out on the streets barefoot, gathering twigs and small logs for the fire.

After an all too brief rest, we headed out to our meeting – the reason I was in Hyderabad. Turns out it was the first day of the Makar Sankranti festivites. Makar Sankranti (also known as Pongal) is a harvest festival celebrated in large parts of India.

It currently generally takes place on the 14th of January,some 21 days after the winter solstice. It commemorates the beginning of the harvest season, the end of the monsoon in the Southern parts of India and is regarded as the beginning of an auspicious phase of the year.

In Andhra Pradesh, the province of which Hyderabad is the capital, Makar Sankranti is celebrated over a four day period. The first day is called Bhogi and it marks the day when people discard old things and concentrate on the new. The disposal or burning of old things at dawn symbolises the lack of attachment to material things, and the embrace of a virtuous way of life.

Seems our arrival coincided with Bhogi.

Later that day, I had the chance to take a closer look at some of the chalk drawings. Below are some pictures.

More coming soon!

Share

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Travel/Urban | Comments (0)

The Ladies & the Gelato

November 23rd, 2010

I’ve been a little busy of late, and not had much time to prepare any posts. Am working towards fixing that, so please bear with me!

I made this shot in Florence, Italy, just before I headed up the hill to the Piazzale Michelangelo. These three German ladies were sitting outside a tiny gelateria, enjoying the sun and the first-class Italian gelato. I love the texture of the wall behind them.

On another note, check out the following:

More coming soon!

Share

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in People, Portraits | Comments (0)

The Tea Cup

September 1st, 2010

This is a shot from my archives, taken on the plane on the way to Bangalore, India for a wedding in October of last year.

I was setting up to make the portrait of an elderly gentleman and realised that I had packed my speedlights in my suitcase, which was *cough* conveniently in the plane’s hold.

So, I had to work with available light. Must say, not much light on a plane. I ended up switching on every reading light I could find and directing it, so far as possible, in the direction of my subject (which is why there are so many spots of light reflecting in the kind old man’s eyes).

I made a number of test shots, with the kind assistance of my frs. This was one of them. I loved how it turned out.

More coming soon!

Share

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in People, Portraits | Comments (0)

Bangalore Portraits – Part IV

January 17th, 2010

This here is the last post featuring portraits I made in Bangalore. You can check out the previous instalments in the series here: Part I, Part II and Part III.

This here is Ganesh. Yep, like the Hindu deity. He is one of the guards at the Bangalore Palace. He was standing to attention outside the entrance for hours, gently smiling to the wedding guests as they flitted by.

This gentleman and his rather large collection of oversized hats came up to our vehicle at one point as we were waiting in traffic.

I came across this friendly dude as he was on his break, just off Commercial Street.

This is Azam. He owns and runs a fruit store called Fresh Fruits on Brigade Street. He is one of the kindest and friendliest people I met in Bangalore.

I’d stopped outside his stall with a few frs, one of whom wanted to try out, and buy, some rare Indian fruit. Azam was happy to walk us through a range of different fruits, telling us where each one came from and what made it special. Then he would cut out slices of each fruit and hand them to us to try. He wasn’t pressing us to buy anything from him. He was just happy to introduce us to the variety of fruits that India has to offer.

At one point as he was talking, a beggar came up to our party and signed to us for some alms. Azam, without interrupting his explanations, and without making any show of it, reached behind him and selected a fruit, making sure it was ripe, and then handed it to the beggar with a slight nod. It was done so naturally and quietly that no-one else in my party noticed.

Be sure to visit this extraordinary man at his fruit shop the next time you’re in Bangalore.

One of the first things I would go on about to most anyone who would listen upon my return from Bangalore was the amount of colour! The wedding itself was incredible on its own, but even everyday wear was so full of rich bright colour. For example, take this gent, his wife and his textiles. He’d set up shop off a tiny side-street off Commercial Street. I used flash in the shot below to make their eyes pop.

I couldn’t not make a portrait of this woman. She was sat by her lonesome in a pile of rubbish on a side-street off Commercial Street.

This coconut seller expertly chopped up a number of coconuts for our thirsty party. When we were done sipping the refreshing milk, he then chopped each coconut in half, carved out a makeshift spoon with one chop of his machete, scooped out the tender pulp out of one half and piled it into the other before handing them back to us (with spoon).

These three boys, who put me in mind of some scene from Slumdog Millionaire, accosted me and a friend outside a building on a street just off Brigade Street. They wanted to shine our shoes. We politely declined. The boys didn’t insist, and made ready to leave. But there was something about the eldest boy that called to me. Something about the kindness in his beautiful eyes. I suggested to them that while I couldn’t pay for their services, I could make their portrait. They agreed and patiently waited a few minutes for me to pull out my camera and set up. Then the eldest brought the younger two closer and held them. I showed them the picture afterwards (I love that about digital cameras) and they thanked me and moved on. The youngest called out to me just moments later, pointing to some bags of potato chips (that’s crisps to you if you’re British) hanging in the display of a tiny store. I think the most heartless would have found it impossible to resist getting a few bags for them. Shortly thereafter, after the boys had moved on, my friend pointed something out to me that I’d missed out on completely: they had sought to shine our shoes, but they themselves were barefoot.

Of all the pictures I made in India – in fact, of all the pictures I made throughout 2009, quite possibly since I first put eye to camera viewfinder – I am proudest of this picture.

More pictures coming soon!

Share

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Portraits | Comments (0)

Bangalore – Slices of Life – Part IV

December 30th, 2009

This is the final instalment in my series of shots of life on the streets of Bangalore as seen through my lens in the short time I visited it. You can check out the preceding instalments here: Part I, Part II and Part III.

This bike was seen on a side street off Commercial Street, propped up against a wall and left to its own devices:

Bangalore Bike

Cubbon Park is a beautiful, sprawling, varied and very peaceful place. Perfect for getting away from the hustle and noise of the big city. Everything seems hushed there and life seems to slow down to a more manageable pace.

Perhaps that’s why some sections of the park are lovers’ lanes. Everywhere you’d look, couples would be lying side by side in the sun, or sitting in the shade of whispering trees, enjoying each others company.

Lovers' Lane

While some relaxed in the park, others seemed to rely on it for their livelihood. Such as this group below which were collecting and bundling logs, possibly for resale:

Bundling

You can see portraits of some of the group here and here.

Below is a dragonfly seen outside the ISCON temple. The little park on the temple grounds were home to many dragonflies, which zipped haphazardly about their business over and through the throngs of faithful and the tourists who went about theirs.

Dragon? Fly!

Below is the view from the doorway to a lawyer’s office. Seen in a building on Brigade Street.

Law Books

This is a shot of the waiting area to the office of a palm reader and fortune teller. Seen in that same building on Brigade Street.

The Waiting Room

On the wall hang three religious icons. Interestingly each references a different religion Hinduism, Christianity and Islam. For some reason, Buddhism seems to have been neglected…

Tolerance

I promised you a story regarding an angry fortune teller. So here it is. I’d followed a friend of mine, who wanted her palm read, up to the fortune teller’s. Before he began his session, I asked him if he’d allow me to take a few pictures. he allowed me to, but asked that I only take the waiting area and not shots of him or the rest of his office. So far so good. He seemed agreeable enough to start with. But his attitude quickly veered. I wish I knew why he took an instant dislike to me. But I’m getting ahead of myself here.

So, I took out my camera and flash, and took a test shot and 2 others (the ones you see up top) before he there was a flare of schoolmasterly anger and he sternly demanded that I take no more pictures and it was implied that he’d prefer it if I took my business elsewhere. So I went off for a wander.

The fortune teller’s offices were on the top floor of a building. The single corridor on that floor opened onto a rooftop terrace. I had barely stepped out into the sunlight to see if I could find an interesting subject or angle for a shot, when I hear our friend the fortune teller waxing forcefully about how no-one was allowed out onto the roof by order of the management of the building. He berated me and demanded that I come back inside. His tone was quite unnecessarily gruff – he could have just explained things nicely but I didn’t wish to make a fuss and so acquiesced without comment.

Shortly afterwards, I left the building to go for a walk. On my return, I met the building’s caretaker in the elevator. She was kind enough to grant me unrestricted access to the roof. Armed with such permission, out I went. I managed to take a shot or two at one end of the roof and no sooner had I crossed to the other side than our old friend the fortune teller became practically apoplexic. I tried to explain to him that I’d gotten express permission from the caretaker but he would hear nothing of it. Instead, he continued to rail at me. He even threatened to have me sued by the building’s owner whom he claimed was a lawyer. Seeing as he was still reading my friend’s palm, I decided it was best not to respond and took my business elsewhere, permanently…

Here is a book shop, if one can call it that, set up on a flight of stairs and against an alley wall off one of the main commercial streets in Bangalore. I passed it twice – on two separate days. The first day, I took the first shot, but the book seller objected and I quickly moved on. The second day, I joked a bit with him and eventually, although he declined my invitation for a proper portrait of himself, he allowed me to take a picture of his setup.

I Am Not

I find it interesting that on the wall above the book seller in the shot above appears a graffiti declaring: I am not a criminal. I wonder who wrote it, and why.

Bookman's Alley

It was serendipitous that this police officer wandered down the alley in the shaft of light, just as I took my shot. I feel it brought the picture together and gave it added depth.

In closing, I leave you in this last post of 2009 with this shot of a beautiful little shrine to Ganesh. Ganesh, or Ganesha, is among the most popular gods from among the Hindu Pantheon. It’s easy to see why. He is typically portrayed as good humoured and he stands for wisdom, learning and as remover of obstacles both physical and spiritual.

Ganesh

Seen on the dashboard of one of the cars which took my friends and I around Bangalore.

One last note – I unfortunately didn’t have the time to include all the pertinent information relating to the gear and settings I used to make the shots above. I’ll be aiming to add them subsequently and very soon. Do check again later! Also, do to heavy workload, and a sporadic internet connection, the next post may be a little delayed. I’ll be posting as soon as am able to!

Happy New Year to one and all! Here’s wishing you a new year filled with good humour, occasions for joy, the good company of family and friends, success in your endeavours, peace and comfort in your private lives, faith and wisdom in the face of adversity, and may you overcome all obstacles with gentle ease.

See you in 2010!

Share

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Travel/Urban | Comments (0)

Bangalore – Slices of Life – Part III

December 26th, 2009

Carrying on from Part I and Part II, here is the next instalment of shots stolen here and there on the streets of Bangalore.

So much of life in Bangalore happens on the streets. More so perhaps than in other places. Hopefully, Parts I and II have gone some way as to demonstrate this.

This man seems to have set up a clothes stall on a foldaway bed by a construction site. Seen on a side street off Commercial Street.

BangaloreSofLIII-2

A building seems to have been demolished recently on this plot of land. Much of the rubble has been cleared away, allowing cows and people to adopted it for somewhat similar uses. Well, perhaps not entirely similar uses. The cows just chill and do whatever it is that cows that have no demands on their time do, while the men face the wall for some more … private business. Seen on a side street off Commercial Street.

BangaloreSofLIII-4

One thing about Bangalore is that there appears to always be heavy traffic on the streets. There didn’t appear to be any time of day when it eased up.  It was either bad, or very bad.

Here, a few workers relax and joke as they sit in the back of a truck.

BangaloreSofLIII-14

Interestingly, the vast majority of vehicles on the roads were either tuk-tuks or motor bikes.

Take a look at this long line of motorbikes, stretching to the end of the street as far as the eye can see. It’s not uncommon to see sights like this, or to come across a parking lot overflowing with motorbikes.

BangaloreSofLIII-1

And here, looking like they’re about to race, a line of tuk-tuks and motorbikes.

BangaloreSofLIII-7

I wanted to get more of a sense of the noise and chaos on the streets. So I turned to night shots. I thought the longer exposures required for them would help me get the feel I was going for. Unfortunately, I only really had one opportunity for those – when in a car heading to the wedding reception on the last night of my stay in Bangalore. I was riding shotgun, so that helped.

Here are a few of the resulting shots.

Bangalore By Night-4

A motorbike swerves around a car and streaks on.

Bangalore By Night-3

Bangalore By Night-2

More pictures coming soon!

Share

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Travel/Urban | Comments (1)

The Gurupurb

December 22nd, 2009

I forget where we were headed to one day when we got stuck in traffic which was worse than normal (for Bangalore). Traffic was backed up a good few hundred meters and it didn’t seem like we were going to be headed anywhere in a hurry. The reason for the delay appeared to be some procession at the intersection in the distance. I grabbed my camera, climbed out of the car heedless of the driver’s protests, and made a dash for it.

Turns out there was a several-thousand-person strong Sikh procession in celebration of the anniversary of Guru Nanak, the founder of Sikhism. The actual date this year was to be the 2nd of November, 2009. But it is not uncommon for celebrations (or Gurupurbs) to be held in the two or three weeks prior to that date.

Standing there, alone, at an intersection and with the chaos of random traffic and stray motorbikes that miss you by mere inches, chanting people, suspicious policemen, whiffs of smoke fumes and the scent of food – it felt like my first real taste of India.

So far, everywhere I went, I had been for all intents and purposes led by the hand. We were spoilt by our hosts: everything had been provided for us – food, shelter, transportation and a pretty full program. Everything we experienced felt like, and for the most part was, part of an intricate, well-organised and well-executed Plan. There was very little room for error in this Plan.

This was not part of the Plan. This was unbridled. It wasn’t muffled behind glass windows, nor seen from the comfort of a hotel terrace, or car seat. I was no longer looking out at India. I was in the middle of the action. And this was pure chaos. It felt like anything could happen. It was a revelation.

As I watched, I chatted away with the family on the motorbike next to me, and tried to get some decent shots of the Gurupurb without getting run over by stray motorbikes or further arousing the suspicions of the 3 policemen who materialised beside me when they saw my camera.

I got treated to a mildly suspicious interrogation by the senior policeman. He seemed to be worried that I might be a journalist of some sort. I assured him I was in Bangalore for a wedding, and when I told him whose wedding it was, he appeared to relax a tad. Amazingly enough, everybody in Bangalore seemed to know this wedding was on. Unfortunately, he was only pacified for a few minutes and soon enough he was again interrogating me. That meant that I wasn’t as free with my movements as I’d otherwise have liked – and had to take the shots I could from where I stood. I felt I should stay put where I was and make small talk with him so as not to get myself carted off to the nearest police station.

I was eventually saved from his questions by two things. The first was that one of my friends joined me to take a look at the procession as well. The second was one of the Sikh revellers. I stopped to ask him some questions about the procession as he seemed to be an authority figure.

He was, like most Bangaloreans, exceedingly friendly, and adopted us immediately, telling us a little about Sikhism, about Guru Nanak and the Gurupurbs in general, about the prayers and the Panj Piare (or Five Beloved Ones). He even went off to collect reading material for us and some of the food that was being distributed.

Below you can see the long line of people making their way down the highway, with vehicles waiting patiently for them to clear. Interestingly, none of those waiting seemed upset, or annoyed at the delay. All waited patiently. Well, except for some people on motorbikes. At one point there seemed to be a small break in the procession, and suddenly tens of bikes were in the fray, zipping left and right in a mad dash for the other side.

The Procession (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 24mm, f3.5, ISO 200, 1/640sec)

Revelers (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 24mm, f3.5, ISO 200, 1/500sec)

This water truck came along at one point in the procession, pipes behind it spraying water on the street. It was followed by tens of barefoot people with makeshift brooms, who proceeded to sweep the street ahead of five sword-bearing figures in bright yellow robes – representing the original Panj Piare.

The Water Truck (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 38mm, f4.2, ISO 200, 1/160sec)

This man was one of those who came immediately after the truck. The poor guy had the unenviable task of trying to sweep while dodging bikers.

Dodging Motorbikes (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 105mm, f5.6, ISO 200, 1/1250sec)

The men were followed by the women, protected by men cordoning them off with bright yellow ropes.

The Sweeps (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 40mm, f4.2, ISO 200, 1/320sec)

Sweeping (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 135mm, f5.6, ISO 200, 1/100sec)

Oddly enough, I was unable to take a picture of all five sword-bearers. I have no idea why that is. Each picture I took had one of those on the fringes hidden from sight by a passerby. A little frustrating it was.

Framed Pani Piare (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 62mm, f4.8, ISO 200, 1/250sec)

Pani Piare Partial (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 56mm, f4.8, ISO 200, 1/250sec)

Food and blessings were distributed from garlanded trucks:

Food, Blessings and Garlands (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 65mm, f5, ISO 200, 1/400sec)

Even schools were participating:

The School Banner (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 55mm, f4.8, ISO 200, 1/160sec)

More pictures coming soon!

Share

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Travel/Urban | Comments (0)

Temples

December 18th, 2009

Architecture is the most enduring of all of mankind’s different forms of cultural expression. Paintings and drawings may fade, paper and papyrus may crumble to dust, day to day items may vanish,  - architecture outlasts them all. Think Petra, or the great pyramids of Egypt or of the Mayan and Incan cultures. Think the Roman ruins in Baalbeck, Lebanon, or the Angkor Wat, or the Great Wall of China, or the Sacre Coeur in Paris, or the countless other reminders of cultural heritage.

It seems to me that some of the most striking examples of cultural expression in architecture often tend(ed) to appear in structures of religious significance. You may say this approach largely no longer applies to our modern, perhaps more secular, times where you could argue that extraordinary expressions in architecture are now almost exclusively the domain of the private sector – high-rise, hotels, office and residential buildings (Burj Dubai, anyone?). But that’s a discussion for another place between more qualified people than I.

I can certainly say that the most striking examples of architecture that I saw in the short time I was  in Bangalore were the Hindu temples I visited, or glimpsed hear and there while on the road. I was less impressed by the only other architectural standouts like the Bangalore Palace or government buildings such as the Vidhana Soudha or the bright red Attara Kacheri (High Court).

All the temples I saw seemed to be of the Dravida (featuring towers with progressively smaller storeys of pavilions) variant prevalent in the South (see here for more info on Hindu temple architecture). These temples are some of the most beautiful structures I have yet seen. The brightness of the colours and the intricacy of the carvings – very striking. I wish I had the time to learn more about them and the culture behind it. I intend to, at some point.

I only managed to visit three temples. I’m using visit in the loosest of ways, of course. I glimpsed quite a few more peppered here and there all over the place. If only there had been time to visit them all.

Temples were hidden in the most unlikely places. You might turn a corner on a tiny side street and suddenly see a beautiful multi-coloured tower rising invitingly in the distance:

An Invitation (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 24mm, f3.5, ISO 200, 1/500sec)

I came across one very small but beautiful temple while exploring side streets behind Commercial Street. I daren’t enter for fear of offence and thus only saw what was visible from the gate. A few pictures appear below:

The Golden Gate (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 100mm, f5.6, ISO 1000, 1/50sec)

Stones (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 112mm, f5.6, ISO 500, 1/60sec)

The Trident (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 60mm, f4.8, ISO 1000, 1/80sec)

The only temple I had the chance to properly visit and explore was the ISKON temple. The temple site is massive, and the temple itself is a sprawling wonder. Unfortunately, cameras were not allowed inside, so the pictures below are a sample from those very few I took from outside (time was the big limitation here).

Two things stay with me from that visit.

The first thing is the privilege of observing people expressing their faith in little big ways. One lady with her young son humbly made an offering at one of the smaller shrines on the granite steps leading up to the main temple. I, along with some friends, stopped at these shrines a while to discreetly watch. And learn. One man I met at each of the shrines. The first time I saw him he was prostrated on the ground before the first. When he had completed his prayers there, he proceeded to complete 108 revolutions around each of the shrines, chanting as he went.

The second thing is the extremely … dare I say, commercial, approach the guys at the ISKON temple took to everything. Entire sections, collectively bigger than the main temple shrines, were dedicated to selling all sorts of stuff, from ISKON approved books to scarves, posters, trinkets and all manner of foodstuffs.

I can understand the need of a non-profit organisation to raise funds, so that bit there isn’t on its own what struck me as odd.

It was that coupled with what one of the guys said at a counter we were led to behind the main shrine after the blessings. He started by requesting donations – telling us about the impressive Food for Life program. But then he showed us sketches and renderings of a new, bigger temple and grounds they were planning to build somewhere in Bangalore.

He lost me at the point where he said they wanted to make it like Disneyland. As in, rollercoaster rides and everything.

He was serious.

I’m confused.

The Sprawling Complex (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 24mm, f3.5, ISO 200 - HDR)

The Tower (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 82mm, f5.3, ISO 200, 1/1000sec)

This temple here below I glimpsed from a bridge as I was heading to the airport with some of my friends. The car stopped by the side of the road to allow the other vehicle in our convoy (the one with the luggage) to catch up with us. I asked the driver if he could go back so I could take a closer look. He duly obliged, reversing some 200 meters on the highway.

The temple was about 50 meters in, away from the main road, hidden behind lush green trees. It appeared to be completely abandoned. I’m not sure if that really is the case, or if people only use it occasionally.

The Abandoned Temple (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 36mm, f8, ISO 200, 1/160sec)

I don’t know why the entrance features very prominent fangs in the gateway. But that doesn’t strike me as particularly inviting.

The Toothy Entrance (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 38mm, f8, ISO 200, 1/160sec)

The Figures (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 135mm, f8, ISO 200, 1/160sec)

To finish, I leave you with this shot, taken from a car whisking us off to a wedding-related event:

The Brightly Coloured Tower (D700, Tamron 24-135mm f3.5-5.6 @ 34mm, f8, ISO 200 - HDR)

More pictures coming soon!

However , I can’t promise the next post may not be in two days. I’m going to be travelling for a bit and my access to the internet is likely to be erratic. :)

Share

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Travel/Urban | Comments (0)

Creative Commons License
Ziad Salloum Photography & The Desert Jerboa by Ziad Salloum is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at www.ziadsalloumphotography.com.